Power BI Paginated Reports in a Day – 02: Power BI Reporting – Part 1

Power BI Paginated Reports in a Day – 02: Power BI Reporting – Part 1


(upbeat pop music) What better place to
start than Module One, Power BI reporting. In this module we’ll cover
the introduction to Power BI and Power BI reporting,
and paginated reporting. CHRIS: And for folks who are familiar with the Power BI cloud service you probably have seen a slide or a variation of this previously where you have the authoring environment, which is Power BI Desktop, which publishes up to
the Power BI service. You connect to a variety of data sources, either through an
on-premises data gateway, or a cloud data sources
in Azure or other services and then again you can provide
access to those reports through both the web portal
and through mobile devices, but with the introduction
of paginated reports this introduced a brand new way to publish content up to the service, which is via Power BI Report Builder, and this is the tool that
you’ll be using going forward for build your paginated
reports in Power BI, publishing those up to the cloud service and then providing access both through the same mechanisms you do your traditional Power BI reports. So if you look at the Power
BI cloud service portfolio, you now have five different
items you have to think of here. You have your authoring environments, which are both Desktop and Report Builder. Again, one for Power
BI interactive reports, the other for your paginated reports, being Power BI Report Builder. You’re publishing those up
to the Power BI service, Power BI Premium, which we’ll touch on a bit
more as we move forward, is a way to handle
large-scale deployments. You get things like
unlimited distribution, paginated reporting, large model sizes, and other features there. And then if you’re looking to
embed your Power BI reports, both paginated reports
and Power BI reports into an application, either internally in, say, SharePoint or
another environment, or externally if you’re building an app. You can use Power BI embedded to do that. And again, Power BI Report
Builder is the newest piece here and it’s supported in all
these same environments that you have today. And again, it requires
either Power BI Premium, or Embedded, which we’ll
talk about here shortly. So with Power BI Report Server,
many of you have heard that, and in fact during my introduction I mentioned I also own that product. We’re focusing today on
the Power BI cloud service, however, Power BI, the paginated reports have
been around for quite some time in SQL Server Reporting Services, and of course, Power BI Report Server. Which is really a super-set of reporting services functionality, and gives you the ability
to create paginated reports, or Power BI reports that can
be published there as well. So the ability to build paginated reports, certainly there for your
on-prem environments, and those reports that you do have there can be migrated up to the service, but for the purposes of
this course and training we’re focusing very much
on the cloud scenario, and what you can create
and publish up there. Right, so what this means is, in fact two different ways to
create reports in Power BI. If you’re familiar with Power BI, you might already know
about these reports, highly interactive. We’re calling them Power BI reports in a way to contrast them
with the paginated reports that you’ll be learning
about in this course. So Power BI reports are optimized for exploration and interactivity, and they present your data
using a comprehensive range of ultra-modern visuals,
including custom visualizations, and they’re perfect
for analytic reporting, enabling your users to
explore and discover, drill in and interact with data to discover relationships and patterns. These reports are developed
either in the Power BI service or, preferably, by using Power BI Desktop. Now you can refer to these reports as interactive analytic reports. Now in contrast, what you’re
about to learn in this course is that Power BI paginated reports are optimized for printing
or PDF generation. They provide you with the ability to produce highly formatted,
pixel-perfect layouts. They’re based on reporting services report definition language, or RDL, and they’re ideal for operational reports like sales invoices, and they’re always developed
by using the desktop tool, Power BI Report Builder. And we refer to these as
pixel-perfect reports. CHRIS: So as we move
into paginated reporting we’re gonna cover a few
different areas here. First of all, what your requirements are to actually start using paginated reports to the Power BI service, the data sources it supports,
and then how you can go and consume those
reports for your own use. So the requirements for paginated reports. You need to have a premium capacity, or a capacity you’ve purchased
through Azure in ASQ. So, if you buy a Power
BI Premium capacity, it would be a P1, 2, or 3. If you’re buying the capacity in Azure, you need a minimum of A4, and it’s also supported in A5 or A6. Now, you’ll be seeing additional ways to actually enable paginated reports in different skews going forward, but for today we’re
focusing on the experience that exists now in either
Premium or Embedded and those scenarios. You do need to ensure that the workload is
enabled for the capacity, so when you first provision
this it will be turned on, but it won’t actually be using any memory until you upload a paginated
report for the first time. So, this is a way for your report authors to not worry about having to coordinate with the capacity admin. To ensure the workload’s turned on, they can just start using
it when they need to, and that’s when memory will
be consumed for that workload. All right, with a quick look at the supported data sources
for paginated reports, they’re either cloud sources
or they’re on-premise sources, and note if they’re on-premises, there must be a gateway so
that the Power BI service can connect to your
on-premises data sources. Let’s reserve a deeper
discussion for data sources when we get to module three. And then, finally, is our introduction to
paginated reporting; how can they be consumed? And there’s a variety of storings here. The first is that the
Power BI service itself, your report users could
go direct to workspaces, or, more preferably, you’ll distribute your
paginated reports through apps. These reports can be consumed
in the Power BI service by using a supported web
browser, the Power BI mobile app, or in custom apps and portals, and the experience allows
working with the report, interacting with it, but also the ability to export the report in different formats,
including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, TIFF
file, MHTML, CSV, or XML. There’s also the ability
for your report users to configure subscriptions
and have the Power BI service deliver the report to them on schedule. Did you know almost 70%
of paginated reports users export the data?
I did not know this. Yeah. Well, how about now we take a look at a comparison of what a
Power BI report looks like compared to a paginated report? That’s a great idea.