HOW TO HIGHLIGHT THINGS IN YOUR VIDEO | 3 Methods for Highlighting Elements or Subjects in Video

HOW TO HIGHLIGHT THINGS IN YOUR VIDEO | 3 Methods for Highlighting Elements or Subjects in Video


You may have seen this before, especially if you watch tutorial or review videos, a specific part of the video frame get highlighted to help bring the viewers attention to it, and today, I’ll show you three different
ways you can do this in Final Cut Pro. Hey guys, whats up. My name is Serge and welcome back to my channel. Let’s not waste any time, and jump tight into Final Cut Pro and take a look at how we can highlight specific elements in our video frame. The first method we’ll take a look at today is by using the Trim tool combined with the
Opacity slider. First thing you need to do is make a copy of your clip and layer it above the
original clip. Hold down the option key, and drag up on your clip to duplicate it. Select the bottom clip, and in the inspector, drag the opacity slider down to around 30
percent. You won’t see any difference in the viewer
yet, because you only see the top layer. Select your top clip, and from the transform dropdown menu, select Crop, and make sure the Trim tool is selected. Now, you can either use the Trim handles in
the viewer, or the sliders in the inspector, to trim your clip to leave only the part of your frame you want highlighted. Click Done. This highlights your element for the duration of your entire clip. If you want the highlighted part to fade in
and out, you have to keyframe the opacity of your bottom
clip. Move your playhead to where you want the highlight effect to start, and with the bottom clip selected, add a keyframe to the opacity slider. Move the playhead back about 10 or 20 frames, and bring the opacity slider back up to 100
percent. Do the same at the end to fade out the highlight effect. Here’s what we have. The second way of highlighting elements in
your video is by using the shape mask in the color inspector. Select your clip, head up to the inspector window, and select the color inspector. From the dropdown menu, select the color correction tool of your choice. On the right hand side, click the mask button, and select Add Shape Mask. In the viewer, move and adjust the shape of your mask over the element you want to highlight. Back in the inspector, select Outside to only have color corrections applied outside of the mask. Now use the color correction controls to bring down the exposure, and maybe saturation, to dim everything outside the mask. Same as in the last method, you can fade this effect in and out by key-framing the color correction. Place your playhead where you want it to start, and add a keyframe to the color correction. Go back a few frames, and reset any corrections. Do the same at the end of your clip. Also, if your highlighted subject moves throughout
your clip, you can keyframe the mask’s position and size by using the keyframe button beside Shape Mask in the inspector. Move your playhead to the start of your clip, position the shape mask over your subject, and add a keyframe to the Shape Mask. Move a few frames ahead, and reposition your mask. Do this for your entire clip. Depending on your subjects movement, you may have to do this frame by frame, or if the speed and direction of movement
is consistent, you may be able to get away with one keyframe at the start, and one at the end. Here’s my finished result. The third way to highlight something in your video frame is by using a combination of a generator and a mask. Open your Titles and Generators browser, and from the Generators dropdown menu, select the Solids category. Select the custom generator and drag and drop it over your clip. Ripple trim it to the same length as your
clip. Next, open the effects browser, scroll down to the masks category, and select either the shape mask, or if the area you want to highlight is an
irregular shape, select the draw mask. Drag and drop your selected mask over the
generator clip. Up in the inspector, click on the Invert mask checkbox, and for nice rounded corners, from the Shape Type dropdown, select B-Spline. Add control points to outline the area you
want to highlight. You can also adjust the feather slider to make the edges of your mask softer. To fade this effect in and out, select your generator clip, and press Command T to add the default cross dissolve transition to the start and end of your clip. You can also change the color of your generator and it’s opacity level for a more unique
look. So that’s three different ways you can highlight an element or a subject
in your video. The method you use really depends on the look you’re going for. Each one has it’s own advantages. I hope you enjoyed this video, and if you did, you can let me know in the
comments below or by hitting the like button, and if you’re new here, make sure to check out the rest of my channel for more Final Cut Pro tutorials. New videos uploaded every week. Thanks for watching, and I’ll see you back here next week.