Hartnell College Library Instructional Orientation

Hartnell College Library Instructional Orientation


Welcome to this instructional library orientation
on how to effectively use the library’s online databases for your research. From the
Hartnell website, find the link for the library under the tab Academics or Students. You can access the databases by going to Research Resources on the Hartnell College Library webpage. On the left, you will see a list
of Top Choices. These are databases most frequently used by students. On the right you will see
an alphabetical list of all the databases the library subscribes to. You can use OneSearch
to access most of the databases at one time. In addition, use OneSearch to locate print
books or ebooks owned by the library. Using OneSearch will be discussed later in this
video. When beginning to do research, it’s important
to gather background information to help you focus your topic and draft your research question.
A good place to start is by going to CQ Researcher. If you are accessing the databases from off
campus, you will need to type in your student id number. CQ Researcher (CQ stands for Congressional
Quarterly) is published by CQ Press and provides unbiased reporting on national topics and
complex issues. Let’s start by looking at the home page. There is always a current featured report
as well as recent reports from past weeks. If you aren’t sure of your area of interest,
you can Browse topics to get some ideas. You can also look at Browse Reports looking at
the Issue Tracker to get some broad information topics. If you already know the topic you
want to research, and you don’t see your topic in this list, enter the topic in the
keyword box in the top right corner. Be sure to choose a report that has a publication
date no older than 10 years. Each report starts with a research question.
This will help you see how a research question is framed. The report is organized with an
introductory Overview; the links to Background and Chronology will give you some history
of the topic; the link to Current Situation will provide information on what is happening
today (or at least when the report was written); Maps and Graphs provide statistical information;
you’ll find a Pro/Con debate on an aspect of the topic, and a Bibliography with additional
information to extend your research. As you read the report, keep a list of keywords you
discover that will help focus your research. You can combine these keywords when searching
other databases to narrow your topic and help define your research question. As you read through the report, footnotes
are available to help further your research. Many of the footnotes are hyperlinked to take
you to the original source being cited. Be sure to look at the Contacts listed. These
are organizations directly involved with the topic: this is a good place to find websites
with credible information. There is a citation tool to help you create
APA citations for creating a References page or MLA citations for your works cited page. .
Most databases provide a tool like this, but they don’t do a perfect job in creating
the citation. So, consider this a draft citation. Copy and paste to your draft works cited or
reference page. Refer to the citation handout on the library webpage to make corrections.
Later on in this video, you’ll be given an example of how to do this. If you want
to save this report, send a link to yourself in an email. Let’s return to the Research Resources page.
Another great database for finding background information is Opposing Viewpoints in Context
published by Gale. This database offers articles and videos covering issues that are debated
nationally providing pro/con viewpoints. Issues of interest are on the homepage. To look at
all the topics addressed, go to Browse Issues. Here you will see an alphabetical listing
of all the general topics covered. On the page for your topic, there is an overview
that provides background information. Again, as you read through, add keywords to your
word bank that you might use to help narrow your topic. Clicking on the hyperlinks in
the text will show you suggested articles and resources to help expand your research. You can translate the article into another
language, increase the size of the text, or listen to the article as you read to help
build understanding. If you want to save this article, you can
send to Google Drive, to One Drive, email it to yourself, or download to your computer
or thumb drive. See the citation tool to find the draft citation
for this article. Copy and paste into your draft works cited page. Note the direction
given to double-check capitalization, dates, and name and make any necessary corrections. Looking back at the issue page, the articles
for the topic are broken into various types of sources of information: Featured Viewpoints,
Viewpoints, Academic Journal Articles, Primary sources, Reference, Biographies, Images and
Videos, Newspapers, Audio, Magazines, statistics and Websites. Suggestions for related topics
are at the bottom of the page. Let’s look at the viewpoints. These articles
will address both sides of the issue. Here is a summary of the article and questions
for you to consider as you read the article. Keep adding relevant keywords to your word
bank. Be sure to include legislation or important people to your list. As we saw in the overview, the same tools are available: translate, text size, listening, hyperlinks, saving the article, and citing the draft citation. Again, let’s return to the Research Resources
page. ProQuest newspapers (published by ProQuest) is a database that provides articles from
ten national and regional newspapers, including the New York Times, Los Angeles Times and
USA Today. With this database, you will want to start using the keywords you have collected
to narrow your research. By entering just the broad topic, far too many results would be returned.
By adding one or more other keywords, you can immediately narrow down the number of
results and show articles that may be more relevant to your research as you formulate
your research question. You can also limit your results by source
type and date. Since this topic is part of the current national discourse, you’ll want
the most recent articles available. You can limit by decade, and then refine the results
even more by the year. You can also limit results to only one type of resource such
as newspapers. With highlighting selected you can see where
the keywords you used are located in the article. The details tab will show the subjects assigned
to the article as well as all the information needed to create your MLA or APA citation.
Related articles are suggested in the sidebar. You can save the article to Google Drive,
One Drive, email the article, or download a pdf to your computer. While there is a citation
tool, unfortunately this database only provides a draft citation using MLA 7th edition which
is not currently in use. You will need to create your own citation for this article.
This will be explained later in this video. The majority of the databases the library
subscribes to are from EBSCO. Most provide articles on specific areas of study such as
American History and Life, CINAHL for articles on nursing, or Business Source Complete. One
of the most popular databases for academic research is Academic Search Complete, a comprehensive collection covering many disciplines. Because of the background information that
has been collected, you can now search for articles that will be relevant to the research
you want to do. By using the AND Boolean term, you are telling the database to show only
articles that have all of the search terms present. For now, leave the field box as unspecified
though later you could search using subject headings once you determine what those headings
are. Select full text to limit your results to
only those articles which can be read right now. If you only want scholarly peer reviewed
journal articles that have gone through an extensive process for determining accuracy
and authority, you can click the box here. For now, leave this unselected. From here, there are additional ways to refine
the results. You may want to limit the date of the articles. By grabbing the blue bar,
move the date to exclude any article that is older than 10 years. There are other choices you can make such
as selecting a source type, subject headings, or a particular publication. You may want to limit your results to only
those articles in a magazine. Notice the periodical icon. Click on the title. From this page,
you can see the title of the article, information about the publisher and when it was published,
the subject terms given to this article and an abstract or summary of what the article
is about. If this article is very useful for your research purposes, you can search by
the subject terms to find other articles with the same terms. This will help you find other
relevant articles. By clicking the PDF full text link, you can
read the article. There are several useful tools provided. You
can save the article to Google drive or add it to a folder (either a folder just for this
session or to a folder you created in your EBSCOhost account. To create an account all
you need is your student email address and a password that you create.) You can also
email the article to yourself. This database provides a citation tool. Copy
the draft citation and paste into your draft works cited or reference page. This magazine article does not have a DOI, so you will need to include a permalink in your citation. Using the URL
in the address bar will not work. Find the permanent URL for this article in the permalink.
You can copy and paste this link into your draft citation if it’s not already there.
Be sure to leave off the https:// You may also want to see the journal articles
that were returned in the search. Select Scholarly Peer Reviewed journals to limit the results; notice the academic journal icon. Click on the title. Just as we saw before, you can
see the publication information (which will be needed when citing this article), the main
ideas or subject terms given to the article, and an abstract or summary of what the article
is about. By clicking on the PDF full text link, you can read the article. As you saw with the magazine article, there
are many tools for your use. You can save the article in a variety of ways such as Google
Drive, email, or in a folder. Look at the citation tool for a draft citation. This article
has a DOI (or digital object identifier) so there is no need to include a permalink in
the citation. Here is another article that might be relevant
to your research question. This article does not have a DOI so be sure the draft citation includes the permalink. You can search most of the databases we subscribe
to at one time by using OneSearch. This tool can be found both on the library homepage
as well as in the Research Resources tab. To find articles, books, videos and other
resources, select the tab OneSearch. Using this tool lets you search both the comprehensive
and subject specific databases at one time. Start with your broad topic. Quite often, the first article is from the database Credo Reference with an encyclopedia article. This
article gives an overview of the topic as well as links to Related Searches and Articles
to help you extend your research. You can refine your results by using the options
on the left navigation bar. If you want to limit the date of available resources to the
last 10 years, change the “from” date and click on refine. Here’s a useful tip:
click on the lock icon if you would like to make these dates persistent throughout your
entire session. The resources listed first in the results
will be print books located on the 2nd floor of the Main Campus library or ebooks, if available.
If you would like to see only those books owned by the library, select the option “Held
by library”. By clicking on the title, you can see the call number where the book will
be found in the stacks as well as a link to the online copy, if an ebook is available.
You can view the subject headings given to the book as well as a summary of the book’s
contents. The call number indicates where the book is located in the book stacks. If an ebook is available, it will be indicated by “Available Online”. Click on the title
to go to the bibliographic information for the ebook. Click on the pdf full text to read
the book. You do not have to read the entire book to
find information to answer your research question. You can browse the table of contents on the
left navigation bar to see if there is a chapter that covers the information you are looking
for. You can also look at the Index. Once you have found the topic, enter the page numbers
in the search box at the bottom of the page. Just as we saw with articles, there are tools
you can use to save the link to the book, email pages, print some pages, and the citing
tool for your draft citation. You can search for articles using multiple
keywords found in your research for background information. Click on Advanced search. Enter
the keywords to focus your search. Select Scholarly peer reviewed journals for
academic journal sources. Click on the title of the article to see the publication information, subject headings, and description and the databases where the article will be found.
Click on the database to access the article. Returning to the library homepage, find the
link on the left navigation bar for “How to Cite Information”. This page gives several
useful links to help you create your works cited page or references pate. Under each of the given citation style headings, there are links to websites that can answer questions. The Online Writing
Lab from Purdue University is a source that many colleges and universities refer to. At the top of the page there are links to
handouts created by the librarians at Hartnell Library to help you take your draft citations
and make them into perfect citations. For MLA style, click on “How to Cite Information
using MLA format”. You can print this document if you would like a hard copy to refer to.
This handout is organized by the many types of resources you may need to cite. Find the
resource you are citing whether it be a print book, an ebook, a journal article in an online
database (both with a DOI or with a permalink), a magazine article in an online database or
a newspaper article in an online database. Note that this is where you’ll find the
citation example for ProQuest Newspapers. Each source type shows a template of how the
citation should be structured and then an example of a correctly formatted citation.
You will also see an example for a report in CQ Researcher, Opposing Viewpoints in Context,
and websites. Below the resource type you will see guidelines for some of the specifics
when creating citations such as which words to capitalize, how to abbreviate dates, and
how to list authors’ names. Also included are the core elements for citations listed
in order as well as some general guidelines for the entire works cited page. Notice that
the page includes hanging indents and double spaces. There is a handout and a video on
how to include these formatting elements at the bottom of the How to Cite
Information page For APA style, click on “How to Cite Information
using APA format”. As with the MLA handout, resources are organized by the different types
of resources whether it is a book or an article in an online database. Remember to include
double spacing and hanging indents. Refer to the handout and video at the bottom of
the How to Cite Information page. Check out the link to Information Literacy
handouts. These handouts cover
some basic topics such as the basics of searching for information, organizing your information,
and how to use information ethically. Remember if at any time you have questions
about how to use the databases or where to find information, be sure to contact the Reference
Librarian by email, by phone, or in person at the Main Campus. Have fun researching for your research paper.