COVID-19: Information for Your Family’s Protection and Prevention

COVID-19: Information for Your Family’s Protection and Prevention


♪ One misconception is if this is a deadly virus. So 80 to 80 plus percent of the people have mild or no symptoms whatsoever. Of the remainder, 20 percent – about one third of those – require medical care and hospitalization. Of the one third that require hospitalization, One third of those – two or three percent of the total – end up needing to be in an intensive care unit. So the odds if you get it are quite good that you will do well. The people most at risk are the elderly and those with other co-morbidities like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, heart failure, those type of things It certainly spreads when people are ill. That’s probably the most common form of spread is when people are coughing or sneezing and you’re in close proximity to them that droplet spray which comes out, then the people breathe that in. You can also contract it if you put your hands on something where there’s a droplet spray, and then you touch your mouth, your nose, your eyes. There is some concern that it can be aerosolized but that’s not really well-documented right now. Aerosolized, meaning it’s not a droplet which goes out and then lands on something but something which stays in the air. So right now we’re concerned about that but there’s no great proof that that happens. Unfortunately, we do know the virus can be transmitted when people are asymptomatic. So you could meet somebody, you could be talking to someone, and they may transmit the virus. It’s probably much less transmission than when you’re sick, but it’s still a possibility. The most likely time for infection after you’ve been exposed to COVID-19 would be between two days and 12 days. And the most common period would be about two to seven or eight days. ♪ Cough etiquette: so, if you’re gonna cough, use a tissue throw it away. Wash your hands. If you don’t have a tissue, cough in your sleeve. Make sure you do a lot of hand washing and avoid touching your mouth, your nose, or your eyes. Right now the CDC is not recommending that we wear face masks. It is effective if you have the disease, and you could imagine if you’re coughing, the face mask will catch some of those droplets and make you less infectious. But there’s enough room around the sides around the nose, and under the chin, that it’s not going to completely prevent that droplet spray kind of coming out. ♪ Call your health care provider first. Tell them about your concerns let them assess the concerns over the phone because what we don’t want is people with mild, potentially COVID-19 infections to come into waiting rooms whether it’s in your doctor’s office, or whether it’s an emergency department, where you might infect other people. And remember, most of this is going to be mild. Over 80 percent of it is going to go away completely on its own if you just stay in your own house. ♪ Well, the game plan right now is supportive care. So that’s I.V. fluids, and help breathing all the way from supplemental oxygen to breathing machines as we need them. There are three drugs which are right now being used in clinical trials. One of them is new and there are several other individual efforts about off label use of current medications. It’s going to take a while for us to figure out which ones work and which ones work best. ♪ Well, vaccine development is going to take several months at a minimum. The testing on healthy people will take at least 90 days and a subsequent vaccine testing 9 to 12 months after that. So in the meantime, it’s a good idea to have cough etiquette, So cough into a tissue or into your sleeve if you don’t have a tissue, and be very careful about hand washing. There should be lots of hand washing and if you can use a hand sanitizer make sure it has at least 60 percent alcohol so that it’s effective. ♪ This is a continuation of our normal preparedness starting seven or eight years ago with Ebola. So we’ve been planning for a long time. We have regular exercises. We can clearly think that this may be relatively mild where in the United States, instead of 80 percent of the people having mild disease, it might be 90 or 95 percent because of the medical facilities and the public health systems we have in place. On the other hand, we can also think on the other end of the scale about a pandemic where our hospitals are significantly challenged in terms of taking care of the patients and how we handle them all. So this is going to have to evolve for a while and then we’ll see where we go. ♪ I think part of it is we have to partner with our public health partners both in the county and the state and the federal level. But we’re going to have to pool resources, assets and then decide on what the best delivery system is. In the meantime, in terms of our own hospitals, I think we’re very well prepared at this point. We’re having daily conversations with our county health departments, the state health departments, with the CDC, and with the FDA. We have phone calls, actually, which occur on a daily basis now, lasting for an hour or more. We are in a continual state of readiness. We’re updating the skills and knowledge of the caregivers. What we want to take away is any of the unknowns by providing information as quickly and as succinctly as we can. ♪