Activists protest facial recognition in Moscow

Activists protest facial recognition in Moscow


The idea is we give people the chance to paint their faces. It’s very important to understand what kind of makeup works and what doesn’t. My name is Katrin Nenasheva, I am an artist and an activist. We came up with an idea for a protest called “Follow.” The point of the protest is to unite and resist against total surveillance. – We’ve already shown our documents. – So what? – What do you mean by “so what?” – Wait… – You want to arrest us or what? Don’t take photos of me. – I have the right to. – Here you don’t have the right. At the police station you can take some. – Your friends are taking pictures of me, I have the right to take some photos too – I’m not taking pictures of you on my personal phone. – Listen, why are you doing this? – I have to. – Who do you have to do this for? So you can bring them to the Lubyanka? – What are you being so shy for? I first came across these “beautiful,” gigantic cameras in the subway. When you walk and this camera is right in front of you. I absolutely do not feel safe. It makes me feel depressed. I feel that I’m not in control of my everyday life. There already have been cases when activists were detected [by the cameras]. They were detained in the subway, for no reason at all. Of course, it immediately becomes clear that the entire point is to make these cameras a political tool. All of this is also important to me because I’m an activist and a political artist. So obviously I have to deal with surveillance in my life in one way or another. Facial recognition is absolutely in violation of the constitution because it is an invasion of privacy. In today’s world nothing is left that is your own besides your face. All of your personal data is tracked. So much about our lives is public already. It’s as if your face is the manifestation of your humanity and individuality. Now they are taking this away. This is part of the powerful and enormous repressive machine.